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Tuesday, December 18, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS:Lassa fever controls need to consider human-human transmission and role of super spreaders.

AGRIBUSINESS:Lassa fever controls need to consider human-human transmission and role of super spreaders.One in five cases of Lassa fever -- a disease that kills around 5,000 people a year in West Africa -- could be due to human-to-human transmission, with a large proportion of these cases caused by 'super-spreaders,' according to new research published in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Lassa fever is an acute viral haemorrhagic illness caused by Lassa virus. First identified in the village of Lassa, Nigeria, in 1969, the disease is thought to be transmitted to humans from contact with food or household items contaminated with rat urine or faeces. There have also been recorded cases of human-to-human transmission within hospital settings, but until now the risk -- or mode -- of transmission has not been clear. Understanding the different modes of transmission and how they are affected by factors such as people's interaction with their environment is crucial for understanding the link between Lassa and changes in the ecosystem, and has important implications for public health strategies. The researchers estimated that around one in five cases (20%) of infection is caused by human-to-human transmission. However, the study also highlighted the disproportionate number of infections that could be traced back to a small number of people, whom the researchers describe as 'super-spreaders' -- rather than passing their infection on to just one other person (if at all), these individuals infected multiple others. It is not clear what makes them a super-spreader -- their physiology, the environment in which they live, their social interactions or probably a combination of these factors. Dr Donald Grant, chief physician at the Lassa ward in Kenema Governmental Hospital and co-author of the research, said: "Simple messages to the local people could change their perceptions of risk and hopefully make the difference. For example, making people aware that the virus can remain in urine for several weeks during the recovery period, could promote improved hygienic practices. Related posts. 1) Rats and Lassa fever. 2) Rats the missing link in disease transmission.

Veterinary Medicine: Parvo viral infection in dogs.

Veterinary Medicine: Parvo viral infection in dogs.The canine parvovirus (CPV) infection is a highly contagious viral illness in dogs. The virus manifests itself in two different forms. The more common form is the intestinal form, which is characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss and lack of appetite (anorexia). The less common form is the cardiac form, which attacks the heart muscles of fetuses and very young puppies, often leading to death. The majority of cases are seen in puppies that are between six weeks and six months old. The incidence of canine parvovirus infections has been reduced radically by early vaccination in young puppies.The signs & symptoms of parvo in dogs, the major symptoms associated with the intestinal form of a canine parvovirus infection are severe, bloody diarrhea,Lethargy,anorexia,fever,vomiting and severe weight loss. Veterinary Medicine: Parvo viral infection in dogs. The intestinal form of CPV affects the body's ability to absorb nutrients, and an affected animal will quickly become dehydrated and weak from lack of protein and fluid absorption. The wet tissue of the mouth and eyes may become noticeably red, and the heart may beat too rapidly. When your dog’s abdominal area is examined, the dog may respond due to pain or discomfort. Dogs who have contracted CPV may also have a low body temperature (hypothermia), rather than a fever. Related: risk of parvo in dogs. Twitter

Veterinary Medicine: Canine parvovirus very rampant and deadly.

Veterinary Medicine: Canine parvovirus very rampant and deadly.A University of Sydney study has found that canine parvovirus (CPV), a highly contagious and deadly disease that tragically kills puppies, is more prevalent than previously thought with 20,000 cases found in Australia each year, and nearly half of these cases result in death. This is the case in Nigeria too,where the scourge of the virus is very high. The study published in Transboundary and Emerging Disease, the national survey of 534 veterinary clinics investigated the number of cases of CPV, their geographic distribution, and financial impacts on pet owners. The survey revealed that CPV remains a major cause of disease in puppies and dogs across Australia, particularly in rural and remote areas of the country, despite improvements in vaccination technology over the last 40 years. CPV in dogs causes the destruction of the intestinal lining and villus atrophy, resulting in severe gastroenteritis, haemorrhagic diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration. The data shows that cost factors were linked to the pet owners' decisions to seek treatment for their dog -- higher costs were linked to pet owners opting for euthanasia instead of seeking treatment. An inability to afford treatment might be a factor in the high euthanasia rates reported by veterinarians. Related posts. Parvo virus outbreak. How to use metronidazole in dogs.

Agribusiness: creating wealth with cassava/garri.

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Monday, December 17, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT: THE BUSINESS OF AGRICULTURE.

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT: THE BUSINESS OF AGRICULTURE. The business angle of agriculture is agribusiness and the skills and tools necessary to ensure success in agriculture is the management of your business components. The success of any business depends on finding a gap and filling it completely,meaning you find an opening,a need, a necessity that will improve lives,promote economic growth and basically satisfy a need /want in your environment and you step up to provide the goods/service/product. Business= finding a need/want/gap = fill it by providing the #product /#service/goods= #reward=#wealth.This is also true in agriculture,find a gap/supply what is needed and make money. The story of ECHBEE FOODS,is not different we found a gap in the cassava/garri value chain and we filled it. We found out that children under 5 were prone to malnutrition and vitamin A deficiency due to poor feeding associated with poverty and lack of knowledge of what to eat mix to provide a balanced ration. Echbee foods formulated balanced foods/meals using the ordinary garri to provide required nutrients not only for children but adults as well. We came up with an array of products using vitamin A garri to provide snacks,cereals,finger foods ,cakes and so much more. The CEO of Echbee foods recently went to IITA and the high point was when i shared my product with the officials at the cassava processing unit and they could not believe our product is made from garri and not cassava flour . Echbee foods is represented on the display table, see
AGRICULTURE.

AGRIBUSINESS: PPR virus poses threat to conservation.

AGRIBUSINESS: PPR virus poses threat to conservation. A team of conservationists from the Royal Veterinary College, WCS, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna published a letter in this week's edition of the journal Science on the threat of the virus peste des petits ruminants (PPR) to conservation. PPR is a viral disease of sheep and goats, of great significance to the livelihood of rural communities, biodiversity conservation, and national and global economies. Repeated mass mortality events in wild steppe and mountain ungulates of the Middle East and eastern Asia is raising significant concerns about the conservation impact of this virus.

FOOD SECURITY.

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How to make money in agribusiness.

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Cassava,cassava and more cassava.

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Saturday, December 15, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS: How to Raise Honeybees.

AGRIBUSINESS: How to Raise Honeybees. Honeybees live in complex communities that may contain as many as 100,000 members. The vast majority of these are the unfertile female bees known as workers. And do they work. They run the hive; feed and clean the queen; gather nectar, pollen, and water (nectar gets converted into carbohydrate-rich honey; pollen is used as is for protein-rich "bee bread"); cool or heat the hive, as needed; feed developing larvae; and make the beeswax they use to build all the hive's cells. During the peak of the season, a worker will live only six weeks before she dies from exhaustion. She'll have gathered enough nectar to make 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey.

AGRIBUSINESS: Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognition.

AGRIBUSINESS: Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognition.Cocoa can be seen as a dietary supplement to protect human cognition and can counteract different types of cognitive decline. Researchers have examined the available literature for the effects of acute and chronic administration of cocoa flavanols on different cognitive domains. It turns out that cognitive performance was improved by a daily intake of cocoa flavanols. A balanced diet is chocolate in both hands -- a phrase commonly used to justify ones chocolate snacking behavior. A phrase now shown to actually harbor some truth, as the cocoa bean is a rich source of flavanols: a class of natural compounds that has neuroprotective effects. In their recent review published in Frontiers in Nutrition, Italian researchers examined the available literature for the effects of acute and chronic administration of cocoa flavanols on different cognitive domains. In other words: what happens to your brain up to a few hours after you eat cocoa flavanols, and what happens when you sustain such a cocoa flavanol enriched diet for a prolonged period of time? AGRIBUSINESS: Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognition.

Agribusiness: 'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate.

Agribusiness: 'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate. Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put a strain on cocoa trees. Reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they say that although the agricultural method used to grow cocoa trees doesn't matter that much, the specific weather conditions do. Cocoa trees grow in hot and humid climates near the equator. Traditionally, these trees are raised together in mixed groves with other types of trees and plants that can cool the air and provide vital shade. The system, called agroforestry, provides a low-stress environment, increases nutrients in the soil and helps maintain ground water levels. But to gain higher yields, growers sometimes plant cocoa trees in solitary, "monocultural," groves, in which the trees are exposed to stressful conditions. In response to the stress, tress produce antioxidants that can potentially counteract the damage, but these compounds also could change the quality characteristics of the beans. Wiebke Niether, Gerhard Gerold and colleagues from FiBL (Switzerland) wanted to find out whether differing growing methods can influence the chemical composition, and potentially the flavor, of cocoa beans.

Veterinary Medicine: A dog's color could impact longevity, increase health issues.

Veterinary Medicine: A dog's color could impact longevity, increase health issues.New research led by the University of Sydney has revealed the life expectancy of chocolate Labradors is significantly lower than their black and yellow counterparts. Veterinary Medicine: A dog's color could impact longevity, increase health issues.

Thursday, December 13, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS: HOW TO PACKAGE FRESH PRODUCE TO ATTRACT CUSTOMERS.

AGRIBUSINESS: HOW TO PACKAGE FRESH PRODUCE TO ATTRACT CUSTOMERS.Farmers invest time and care to cultivate and harvest their produce. To attract the consumers, they need to ensure their products stay fresh with a packaging that will please buyers. Packaging is the first step towards adding value to fresh produce. Decent packaging sets the tone for what follows; it catches the consumers eye first. If you want to see this at work, visit the fresh market stores and you will notice that many consumers make decisions on what to buy based on packaging. A good packaging Consumers of fresh produce on most occasions make purchases after work, when they are tired. In such a case, in most instances, they have five to 10-minute stops off at the supermarket on their way home, just to pick up a few things. They want to run through few items, get back in the car and get home. Supermarkets provide the most common transporter-package: the bag at the check-out, either plastic or paper. But consumers sometimes only buy one item and, to save time, rush off with, “I don’t need the bag.” This is where prepacked fresh produce come in handy. With growing competition, farmers should invest time and effort in creating a product that is pleasing to the eye and piques the interest of a busy customer passing by the aisle. A good packaging should make the consumer take a second look. Because consumers are in a hurry, the brand name may not be enough to catch his eye. The total ‘look’ must be recognisable. Package shape is another way to add to your brand identification.

AGRIBUSINESS: FARMERS SHARE TOP LESSONS FOR PROFITABLE BUSINESS.

AGRIBUSINESS: FARMERS SHARE TOP LESSONS FOR PROFITABLE BUSINESS.Many people think farming is the easiest way to make money, away from a demanding office job. The reality couldn’t be farther from the truth. Farming is actually a school where farmers pick important lessons, some learnt the hard way. All through the year, we spoke to farmers who stood out in different ways. They are people who have excelled in poultry-keeping, livestock-farming, horticulture and even those who have found the trick of value addition on different products. They share the successes, failures, challenges learnt through 2018. Joseph Boit, maize and dairy farmer — Focus on a small unit and perfect it Joseph Boit, who won the BAKE Kenyan Blog award 2015 in Environment and Agriculture category. He tried horticulture on five acres of land but the huge farm was beyond what he could control. At harvest time, we went home empty handed. For years, Boit has perfected the art of maize-farming, a venture that has been passed on in his family for generations. Not long ago, Boit tried a hand in hay farming and allocated 100 acres for the same, reserving only 10 acres for maize. But Boit is always trying new things and last year, he ventured into horticulture. He set aside 5 acres for kales, onions and watermelons and trusted that rain water would supplement a water pan that was adjacent to the farm. But he was in for a rude shock when it failed to rain for a long time and the water pan dried. “I was unable to water the whole five acres and the onions failed to bulb. It was a total loss,” he says. When it finally rained, it was torrents that destroyed the whole crop of watermelons he had on 4 acres. The kales were in bad shape too and could not fetch much on the market. The loss taught him important lesson. “I should have focused on one acre and perfected it. I now understand why most horticulture farmers only do it on small plots that are easy to manage. I have learnt that horticulture is the most rewarding venture which also requires a lot of resources and dedication. It is not like maize farming. It needs proper planning and ensuring that everything is right.” Boit has not given up on horticulture. In fact, he has better plans for next year. “I am planting capsicum and cabbages on one acre next year. I have invested in a 3,000-litre tank near the farm as well as better irrigation system. I have fenced the whole farm because I also have many goats that may be a nuisance to my crops. I also have my market sorted since I have a motorbike and I will do deliveries on my own. I am not trusting middlemen and I will set my own prices. If all goes well, I am looking at Sh500, 000 profit just from horticulture by the end of next year.” continue

AGRIBUSINESS: Feeding 10 billion people by 2050 within planetary limits is achievable.

AGRIBUSINESS: Feeding 10 billion people by 2050 within planetary limits is achievable. A study published in the journal Nature, is the first to quantify how food production and consumption affects the planetary boundaries that describe a safe operating space for humanity beyond which Earth's vital systems could become unstable. A global shift towards healthy and more plant-based diets, halving food loss and waste, and improving farming practices and technologies are required to feed 10 billion people sustainably by 2050 Adopting these options reduces the risk of crossing global environmental limits related to climate change, the use of agricultural land, the extraction of freshwater resources, and the pollution of ecosystems through overapplication of fertilizers, according to the researchers. "No single solution is enough to avoid crossing planetary boundaries. But when the solutions are implemented together, our research indicates that it may be possible to feed the growing population sustainably," says Dr Marco Springmann of the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food and the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, who led the study. "Without concerted action, we found that the environmental impacts of the food system could increase by 50-90% by 2050 as a result of population growth and the rise of diets high in fats, sugars and meat. In that case, all planetary boundaries related to food production would be surpassed, some of them by more than twofold."

AGRIBUSINESS: Simple steps to climate-proof farms have big potential upside for tropical farmers.

AGRIBUSINESS: Simple steps to climate-proof farms have big potential upside for tropical farmers.Climate-smart agriculture boosts yields, mitigates extreme weather impact and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. A new study points to profitable opportunities for farmers and the environment. Cacao farmers in Nicaragua lose their crop, the main ingredient for chocolate, to fungal blight and degrading soils. Yields drop in Vietnam's rice paddies because of higher temperatures and increased salinity. Bean and maize growers in Uganda see their plants die during severe dry spells during what should be the rainy season. The two-punch combination of climate change and poor agricultural land management can be countered with simple measures that keep farms productive and profitable. Implementation of these climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices can increase yields, benefit the environment and increase farmer income, according to a new cost-benefit analysis by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) published November 19 in PLOS ONE.

Veterinary Medicine: Dogs set to benefit from simple blood test to spot liver disease.

Veterinary Medicine: Dogs set to benefit from simple blood test to spot liver disease.A new blood test can quickly spots early signs of liver disease in dogs,according to a new study . The test means that fewer dogs will have to undergo invasive liver biopsies. The tests developed by vets quickly spots early signs of liver disease in dogs. The test is based on insights gained from human patients and will help vets identify damage and start treatment early, saving the lives of many dogs. The test which is to be launched worldwide means that fewer dogs will have to undergo invasive liver biopsies, findings by the University of Edinburgh suggest. Diagnosing canine liver disease is challenging and catching early signs of damage is key to its treatment. Current diagnosis is based on biopsies, which are expensive and can lead to complications.

AGRIBUSINESS: How plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs.

AGRIBUSINESS: How plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs.Researchers have discovered that living plants are literally 'green' power source: they can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs. Researchers also showed that an 'hybrid tree' made of natural and artificial leaves can act as an innovative 'green' electrical generator converting wind into electricity. Sustainable energy sources, which are pollution free and environmentally friendly, are one of the key challenges of world's future society. The interdisciplinary team of roboticists and biologists at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Pontedera (Pisa, Italy), found that living plants can help with electricity. Fabian Meder, Barbara Mazzolai and their coworkers at IIT discovered that living plants are literally "green" power source, which may become one of future's electricity supplies that perfectly integrates in natural environments and is accessible all over the world. Researchers discovered that plants can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs. Researchers also showed that an "hybrid tree" made of natural and artificial leaves can act as an innovative "green" electrical generator converting wind into electricity. .

AGRIBUSINESS: Climate change increasing the prevalence of harmful parasite.

AGRIBUSINESS: Climate change increasing the prevalence of harmful parasite.A rise in a parasite called liver fluke, which can significantly impact livestock production in farms in the UK and across the world, could now be helped by a new predictive model of the disease aimed at farmers. Cattle or sheep grazing on pastures where the parasite is present can become infected with liver fluke, which develops in the liver of infected animals, leading to a disease called fascioliasis. Current estimates suggest liver fluke contributes to around £300 million annually in lost productivity across UK farms and $3 billion globally. Until now, risk predictions have been based on rainfall estimates and temperature, without considering the life-cycle of the parasite and how it is controlled by levels of soil moisture. This, combined with shifts in disease timing and distribution attributed to climate change, has made liver fluke control increasingly challenging. A new tool for farmers has now been developed by the Bristol team to help them mitigate the risk to their livestock. The model, which works by explicitly linking liver fluke prevalence with key environmental drivers, especially soil moisture, will help farmers decide whether they avoid grazing livestock on certain pastures where liver fluke is more prevalent, or treat animals based on when risk of infection will be at its peak. Importantly, the model can be used to assess the impact of potential future climate conditions on infection levels and guide interventions to reduce future disease risk. Professor Thorsten Wagener from Bristol's Cabot Institute added: "Water-related diseases can be difficult to eradicate using medicine alone, as resistance to available drugs is increasing. We need predictive models of disease risk that quantify how strongly infection risk is controlled by our rapidly changing environment to develop alternative intervention strategies."

AGRO-VETERINARY: Whole blood test for toxoplasmosis is sensitive and specific.

AGRO-VETERINARY: Whole blood test for toxoplasmosis is sensitive and specific.Transmission of toxoplasmosis from mother to fetus can lead to severe congenital problems and fetal death, and tests for the parasitic infection during pregnancy are critical. Now, researchers have showed the efficacy of a low-cost whole blood test for toxoplasmosis. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have showed the efficacy of a low-cost whole blood test for toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasmosis results from infection with the Toxoplasma gondii parasite, usually transmitted to humans from eating undercooked contaminated meat or through exposure to infected cat feces. Existing tests for the infection are serum tests, which require blood samples to be processed using infrastructure and technology which can be prohibitive in developing areas and unaffordable in developed countries like the United States.

Monday, December 10, 2018

Cocoa from Ghana and Ivory Coast feeding multi-billion euro chocolate industry in The Netherlands.

Cocoa from Ghana and Ivory Coast feeding multi-billion euro chocolate industry in The Netherlands.Ghana and the Ivory Coast, its western neighbour, are the two biggest producers of cocoa in the world. And cocoa from these two West African countries is the backbone of the thriving chocolate industry in The Netherlands. According to a report by Statistics Netherlands (CBS), the total value of chocolate and semi-finished products including cocoa butter produced in that country and exported, reached €2.8 billion in 2015. That is an increase of 6 per cent on that of 2014 and an “all time-record.”

Sunday, December 9, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS: How To Make Jewelry From E-waste.

AGRIBUSINESS: How To Make Jewelry From E-waste.Electronic waste or e-waste, that this technological rubbish is now commonly referred to, is a growing issue and is simultaneously catching the media’s attention at the same rate. The New York Times declared last month that “e-waste offers an economic opportunity as well as toxicity,” due to the rising number of recycling companies being founded, whilst Forbes stunned its audience last year with the prediction that e-waste is to “hit 49.8 million tonnes” by the end of this year. Eliza ‘Lylie’ Walter, the 26-year-old founder of London based women’s and men’s jewellery brand Lylie’s, as it strives to rebel against the industry’s traditional methods of manufacturing because of its troublesome consequences on the environment. she stressed that she felt the accessory industry was lacking in any environmentally aware brands, as it is reported “only 16 percent of e-waste is being recycled – a fact that shocks her website’s visitors. To provide a solution, the brand prides itself on using only salvaged metals, which are typically found in discarded devices such as mobile phones, as a primary source. These metals are then put through a meticulous step by step process, which includes each design being transformed into 3D from sketches, either through carving by hand, or with Computer Aided Design (CAD), as well as 3D printing. The brand's preferred method is wax carving by hand, which can take up to 200 hours per drawing.

AGRIBUSINESS: Under-nutrition a ‘potent accelerant’ of TB(tuberculosis) epidemic.

AGRIBUSINESS: Under-nutrition a ‘potent accelerant’ of TB(tuberculosis) epidemic. Under-nutrition, which affects nearly 800 million people worldwide, is a “potent accelerant” of the global tuberculosis epidemic, impacting disease incidence and treatment outcomes in infected patients, according to researchers. According to the 2018 WHO Global Tuberculosis Report, the global TB burden is not shrinking fast enough to reach milestones set by the End TB Strategy, which aims to reduce TB deaths by 90% and new cases by 80% by 2030. To reach those targets, officials say case identification and treatment gaps must be closed and action must be taken to further understand TB. “Under-nutrition is also the leading risk factor for TB and almost one in five cases of TB worldwide can be attributed to it. About 800 million individuals worldwide are undernourished due to a panoply of socioeconomic reasons. These unfortunate individuals are incredibly vulnerable to the ravages of the TB epidemic.” Summarizing their review, Sinha and colleagues said the impact that under-nutrition has on TB means addressing it will be a vital component of the End TB Strategy. They aimed to investigate its effect on immune response, vaccine response and TB incidence, severity and treatment outcomes.

AGRIBUSINESS: How E-waste affects the environment and our health.

AGRIBUSINESS: How E-waste affects the environment and our health. What is E-waste? E-waste is a short form for electronic waste, it is a term for electronic products that have become unwanted, non-working or obsolete, and have essentially reached the end of their useful life. The effects of improper disposal of e-waste on the environment impacts and pose very real threats and dangers to the global environment at large. Improper disposal of these electronic wastes affect the soil, air, and water components of the environment. AGRIBUSINESS: How E-waste affects the environment and our health. Effects on air One of the most common effect of E-waste on air is through air pollution. For example, a British documentary about Lagos and its inhabitants, called Welcome to Lagos, shows a number of landfill scavengers who go through numerous landfills in Lagos looking for improperly disposed electronics which includes wires, blenders, etc., to make some income from the recycling of these wastes. These men were shown to burn wires to get the copper (a very valuable commodity) in them by open air burning which can release hydrocarbons into the air. Effects on water. When electronics containing heavy metals such as lead, barium, mercury, lithium (found in mobile phone and computer batteries), etc., are improperly disposed, these heavy metals leach through the soil to reach groundwater channels which eventually run to the surface as streams or small ponds of water. Local communities often depend on these bodies of water and the groundwater. Apart from these chemicals resulting in the death of some of the plants and animals that exist in the water, intake of the contaminated water by humans and land animals results in lead poisoning. Some of these heavy metals are also carcinogenic. Effects on soil Heavy metals and chemicals from e-waste enter the “soil-crop-food pathway,” one of the most significant routes for heavy metals’ exposure to humans. These chemicals are not biodegradable—they persist in the environment for long periods of time, increasing the risk of exposure. These dangers posed by improper disposal on the environment ultimately have impacts on human beings -human cost; the health effects of these toxins on humans include birth defects (irreversible), brain, heart, liver, kidney and skeletal system damage. They also significantly affect the nervous and reproductive systems of the human body. When computer monitors and other electronics are burned, they create cancer-producing dioxins which are released into the air we breathe. If electronics are thrown in landfills, these toxins may leach into groundwater and affect local resources. Thus improper disposal of e-waste not only has effects on the environment, it indirectly and ultimately poses grave dangers to humans and livestock.

AGRIBUSINESS: How To Start E-waste Recycling Business.

AGRIBUSINESS: How to start E-waste recycling business.Electronic waste, or e-waste, as we all know it, is a term for electronic products that have become unwanted, non-working or obsolete, and have essentially reached the end of their useful life. As technology advances at such a high rate, many electronic devices become “trash” after a few short years of use. In fact, whole categories of old electronic items contribute to e-waste, such as VCRs being replaced by DVD players, and DVD players being replaced by blue-ray players. E-waste is created from anything electronic: computers, refrigerators, TVs, monitors, cell phones, PDAs, VCRs, CD players, fax machines, printers, etc. E-Terra Technologies Limited, in partnership with the Federal Ministry of Environment and the Lagos State Environmental Protection Agency (LASEPA), in Lagos, Nigeria have come to West Africa’s aid. The company’s key region of strength in the eco-friendly management of e-waste is their ability of utilizing incorporated state-of-the-art technologies. E-Terra Technologies Limited is an eco-friendly company. They offer e-waste collection and disposal services targeting environmentally friendly organizations seeking to dispose of their unwanted end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment. They have a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) in Lagos, Nigeria where they perform pre-assessment, pick up, destruction, sorting, and recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) . AGRIBUSINESS: How to start E-waste recycling business. Thinking of starting the #business as a #vendor? Collect the e-waste and drop off here to make money.

AGRIBUSINESS: : How to recycle old mobile phones to extract gold and save gorilla population.

AGRIBUSINESS: : How to recycle old mobile phones to extract gold and save gorilla population. "For every 30-40 mobile phones that are recycled, on average, one gram of gold can be recovered," Dr Litchfield says. "Just as mobile phone sales are soaring, and gold content is increasing in some smartphones, natural sources of gold are expected to run out by 2030." UniSA Conservation Psychologist and Great Ape expert Dr Carla Litchfield, the paper's lead author, says if 'conflict' elements -- including gold and coltan -- can be recovered from old mobile phones, there is less incentive to mine gorilla habitats for the same minerals. In Germany, by 2035 it is predicted that more than 8000 tonnes of precious metals will lie in unrecycled mobile and smartphones, and in China, by 2025 an estimated nine tonnes of gold, 15 tonnes of silver and 3100 tonnes of copper will also be out of the supply loop in 0.35 billion unrecycled phones. AGRIBUSINESS: : How to recycle old mobile phones to extract gold and save gorilla population. The link between hoarding disused mobile phones and the decimation of Grauer gorilla habitats is explored in a paper published today in PLOS ONE, authored by University of South Australia researchers and Zoos Victoria. Zoo visitors and the broader Victorian community were educated about the value of recycling discarded phones to extract special metals used in their construction as the same metals which are being mined in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), not only destroying gorilla habitats but also funding wars and human rights abuses. The authors point out the barriers to recycling used phones, including lack of e-waste recycling points in many countries, secrecy around the phones' mineral composition, privacy concerns around accessing old data, and just plain hoarding. Hoarding is a problem since precious metals are not extracted and returned to the circular economy, creating the need to mine these metals in wilderness areas and when people do discard their old phones, most dispose of them in their household waste, ending up in landfill, where they leach toxic metals.

AGRIBUSINESS : Agricultural waste is driving us towards greener transport.

AGRIBUSINESS : Agricultural waste is driving us towards greener transport.Composite materials made from agricultural waste could be used to produce sustainable, lightweight and low-cost applications in the automotive and marine industries. A team of researchers, led by the University of Portsmouth, have developed a bio-composite material using date palm fibre biomass (biomass is a term that includes waste material from plants, food waste and sewage) that can be used in non-structural parts, such as car bumpers and door linings. The date palm fibre polycaprolactone (PCL) bio-composite is completely biodegradable, renewable, sustainable and recyclable, unlike synthetic composites reinforced by glass and carbon fibres. In a study, published in the journal Industrial Crops and Products, the researchers tested the mechanical properties of the bio-composite. They found that the date palm fibre PCL had increased tensile strength and achieved better low-velocity impact resistance than traditional human-made composites.

AGRIBUSINESS: How to Turn Disengaged Employees into Brand Ambassadors.

AGRIBUSINESS: How to Turn Disengaged Employees into Brand Ambassadors.Disengaged employees can cause major disruption to your business. So how can you turn the situation around and make brand ambassadors out of your disengaged staff? Disengaged employees negatively affect a lot more than you may think. Even actively engaged employees can be directly impacted by decreased morale within a team if other member’s levels of engagement drop – it’s like a black cloud hovering over the team and I’m sure most of us know what it feels like to work alongside someone who is feeling disgruntled or unsatisfied in their job. Disengagement causes a domino effect; Low satisfaction levels amongst employees leads to low customer service levels which in turn means lowered revenue. None of which is benefiting anyone. Unmotivated employees offer poor customer service which goes further than direct sales. Even those disengaged employees working behind the scenes are not representing their employers in the best light to the people they know. I think it’s fair to say we have all come across a Facebook status rant relating to places of work which can impact future potential business and is detrimental to the brand image. So how can employers turn this situation around? By introducing efforts to turn these disengaged employees into not only just engaged, but passionate brand ambassadors.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS: how to start a tryctor business to promote mechanization.

AGRIBUSINESS: The tryctor. The demand for tractors over the next 10 years is estimated at over 300,000 units in Nigeria and across the West African region. However, there are only about 20,000 currently available. A new business gap is available for investment in farm tools,implements and tractors to lease out to farmers, An investment in a tryctor is all you need to make money from this gap. The Tryctor is a mini tractor based on a motorcycle design modified into a 3 wheeler using parts which are locally available. By attaching various implements, the Tryctor is designed to carry out several farming operations similar to those of a conventional tractor, but to a smaller scale. In addition, it is a useful means of transportation once the trailer is attached to convey produce to nearby markets. The Tryctor has also been designed with a special feature which enables you to use in place of a generator to produce electricity. This makes it ideal for any small-scale farmer. The Tryctor is affordable, easy for farmers to maintain and simple enough for mechanics to carry out basic repairs should the need arise. The Tryctor is supplied with: !) A Disc Plough. 2)Cultivator and a Trailer. 3) a Tine.

Agribusiness: Agroecological tropical farming systems through crop–livestock integration.

Agribusiness: Agroecological tropical farming systems through crop–livestock integration. An analysis of the operations and performance of 17 farms in three different tropical zones (Guadeloupe, Brazil, Cuba) demonstrates that systems are more agroecological, efficient and resilient when a diverse range of activities are practiced and nutrient cycles are closed with higher-intensity crop–livestock integration flows. Today’s agriculture must respond to increasingly complex demands. It must meet the ever-growing demand for food, while using fewer inputs, as natural resources become more scarce, while also adapting to the challenges brought on by the massive changes affecting socio-ecosystems. Agroecology offers a conceptual framework for developing farming systems that are productive, self-sufficient, efficient and resilient to better meet these challenges. Agribusiness: Agroecological tropical farming systems through crop–livestock integration. Crop–livestock integration (CLI) incorporates a number of agroecological principles (Dumont et al., 2013), such as closed cycles and using diversity to improve resilience. Researchers looked at how farms with more integrated mixed crop–livestock systems (with diverse and complex nutrient flow networks) were more productive, efficient, self-sufficient and resilient (Bonaudo et al. 2014). Their study focused on two areas.

AGRIBUSINESS: Transforming our food system to ensure a sustainable future.

AGRIBUSINESS: Transforming our food system to ensure a sustainable future. By 2050, the world will have almost 10 billion people. It will be impossible to feed everyone without exacerbating poverty, accelerting deforestation and increasing GHG(Green House Gas) emissions unless we start making substantial changes to our food system now. This issue is covered in a new report, Creating a Sustainable Food Future , published on December 5 in the World Resources Report series. The report was produced by World Resources Institute(WRI)in partnership with the World Bank, UN Environment, UN Development Programme, CIRAD and INRA. In the report, WRI suggests ways of feeding almost 10 billion people by 2050. Food demand is set to rise by over 50%, with demand for animal-based food products (meat, dairy and eggs) likely to grow by almost 70%. Hundreds of millions of people already go hungry, Farming uses around half the world's green areas and generates a quarter of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unsurprisingly, the report says that there is no silver bullet. However, it does offer a menu of 22 options that suggests it is possible to feed everyone sustainably. "This resembles the "Healthy" scenario established by the CIRAD-INRA Agrimonde-Terra foresight exercise in many important ways. However, the two differ in terms of their initial objectives. WRI set out to increase food production while reducing GHG emissions and limiting the spread of agriculture. WRI estimates that feeding the world sustainably while reducing agricultural land use and GHG emissions by 2050 will mean the whole world: (1) reducing demand by cutting food loss and waste, eating less beef and lamb, using crops for food and feed rather than biofuels, and reducing population growth by achieving replacement fertility levels; (2) increasing crop and livestock productivity to higher than historical levels but on the same land area; (3) stopping deforestation, restoring peat lands and degraded land, and linking yield gains to protection of natural landscapes; (4) improving aquaculture and managing wild fisheries more effectively; (5) using innovative technologies and farming methods that lower agricultural GHG emissions. Limiting global warming will mean acting on the food sector. Food lies behind most environmental and development issues: deforestation, malnutrition, biodiversity loss, water scarcity, climate change, water pollution and more. By improving how the world's food is produced and consumed, we can treat the cause and not just the symptoms.

AGRIBUSINESS: How to increase insurance adoption in developing countries.

AGRIBUSINESS: How to increase insurance adoption in developing countries.Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurances would offer in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops. A simple but effective solution tested by researchers from the University of Zurich has increased insurance adoption to over 70 percent. AGRIBUSINESS: How to increase insurance adoption in developing countries. For decades, companies, aid organizations and governments in developing countries have tried to increase the numbers of farmers who insure their crops. However, farmers' adoption remains stubbornly low. Lorenzo Casaburi from the Department of Economics at the UZH and his co-author Jack Willis identified a simple solution to increase the take up rates of these insurance. They found that, when it comes to crop insurance, timings and what economists call time preferences are crucial. In standard insurance products, premiums are paid at a time when farmers are cash strapped. In addition, as the potential benefit from the insurance, i.e. the payout in case of a bad harvest, lies in the future, its value is mentally discounted. This potential money in the future seems worth less than the price it would cost today. The farmer decides that it is therefore not worth the investment. AGRIBUSINESS: How to increase insurance adoption in developing countries.Timing of payment of insurance premiums is key. Usually, crop insurances have to be paid at the beginning of the season, just as the farmers need money for inputs, seeds, machinery and to feed their family until harvest, when they can sell their produce. The researchers made a very simple change to the insurance policy: they shifted the payment date for the insurance to harvest time. In case of a good harvest, the farmer received the price for his harvest from which the insurance premium was deducted. In case of a bad harvest, the farmer received a price for his harvest and an insurance payout. The researchers tested this innovation though a randomized controlled trial. "By simply moving the payment date to harvest time, we increased the pick-up rate for the insurance from 5% to 72%," says Lorenzo Casaburi and adds, "what's more, it was the poorest farmers that increased their demand the most."INSURANCE

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

VETERINARY MEDICINE: Canine 'aptitude test for working dogs.

VETERINARY MEDICINE: Canine 'aptitude test for working dogs.The canine labor market is diverse and expansive. Assistance dogs may be trained to work with the visually or hearing impaired, or with people in wheelchairs. Detection dogs may be trained to sniff out explosives, narcotics or bedbugs. Other pups even learn to jump out of helicopters on daring rescue missions. VETERINARY MEDICINE: Canine 'aptitude test for working dogs. A canine cognition test could help organizations that train working dogs identify the dogs that are most likely to succeed, according to new research. If organizations could better predict which dogs will succeed in working roles, it could save thousands of dollars in training costs and ensure people in need get dogs faster.

RESEARCH: Sniffer dogs could detect malaria in people.

RESEARCH: Sniffer dogs could detect malaria in people.Dogs detect malaria by sniffing socks worn by African children. As the global battle against malaria stalls, scientists may be adding a novel tool to the fight: sniffer dogs. In recent tests trained sniffer dogs successfully diagnosed malaria infections simply by sniffing samples from socks worn briefly by children from a malaria endemic area of West Africa, according to a new study presented at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. "People with malaria parasites generate distinct odors on their skin and our study found dogs, which have an incredibly sensitive sense of smell, can be trained to detect these odors even when it's just on an article of clothing worn by an infected person," said Steven Lindsay, a public health entomologist at in the Department of Biosciences at Durham University in the United Kingdom and the lead investigator on the study. The research was conducted with colleagues from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), the Medical Research Council Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and experts from a charity, Medical Detection Dogs. The charity has trained dogs to detect a variety of maladies, including prostate cancer and people at risk of slipping into a diabetic coma.

VETERINARY MEDICINE : Glyphosate found in cat and dog food.

VETERINARY MEDICINE : Glyphosate found in cat and dog food.A new study finds that glyphosate, the active herbicidal ingredient in widely used weed killers like Roundup, was present at low levels in a variety of dog and cat foods the researchers purchased at stores. A new Cornell study published this month in Environmental Pollution finds that glyphosate, the active herbicidal ingredient in widely used weed killers like Roundup, was present at low levels in a variety of dog and cat foods.VETERINARY MEDICINE : Glyphosate found in cat and dog food. The study grew out of a larger interdisciplinary research project led by Brian Richards, senior research associate in biological and environmental engineering, and supported by the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future's Academic Venture Fund, which sought to reassess glyphosate mobility and impacts in several contexts: movement from crop fields in surface water, impacts on soils and on animals consuming it in their feed.VETERINARY MEDICINE : Glyphosate found in cat and dog food.