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Saturday, December 9, 2017

Parasitic eye infection poses significant threat to UK dogs and may have implications for other UK animal, human populations.

Parasitic eye infection poses significant threat to UK dogs and may have implications for other UK animal, human populations.A parasitic worm that is becoming increasingly common in Europe poses a significant threat to UK dogs, warn experts in a new report. A research team, led by John Graham-Brown at the University of Liverpool, describe three cases in UK dogs with recent history of travel to mainland Europe. They call for vigilance when examining travelled dogs and warn that other animals -- and people -- should also be considered at risk of infection when travelling to areas where the parasite is endemic. Thelazia callipaeda is a parasitic worm capable of infecting a range of mammalian host species including dogs, cats and human beings. The worm is found in a species of fruit fly known to be present in the UK. The researchers believe the introduction of this species is a potential risk. Adult worms live in the eyes and associated tissues. Infected animals show a variety of symptoms, from mild conjunctivitis to severe corneal ulceration which, if untreated, can lead to blindness.