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Showing posts with label rats. Show all posts
Showing posts with label rats. Show all posts

Friday, December 22, 2017

Heroic rats detect land mines and now they might help save an endangered anteater.

Heroic rats detect land mines and now they might help save an endangered anteater.The pangolin, an endangered anteater that is one of the world’s most poached animals, could use a hero. Fortunately, a big rat is training for the job. Actually, 11 African giant pouched rats are. At a research center in central Tanzania, the 2-foot-long rodents are learning to detect the smell of pangolins’ armor-like scales, which are smuggled to Asia for use in sham traditional remedies. If the rats succeed, they and their twitching noses could eventually deploy to ports, national park borders and even highways to sniff out illegal shipments and help bust traffickers. The species already has a strong track record in detection. The Belgian organization APOPO has been training their “heroRATS” to find land mines for 20 years, and it says the animals have helped clear more than 100,000 mines from former war zones. In the past decade, the rats have been used to detect tuberculosis, a highly infectious disease that public health facilities often miss. They can screen 100 mucus samples in 20 minutes — a job that would take clinics four days — and APOPO says they’ve boosted TB detection by 40 percent at the clinics they work

Sunday, April 10, 2016

VETERINARY MEDICINE: Rats linked to depression in man.

VETERINARY MEDICINE: Rats linked to depression in man. A study by Danielle German, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the Bloomberg School the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows the link between rat problems and depression in man. Residents of Baltimore's low-income neighborhoods who believe rats are a big problem where they live are significantly more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms such as sadness and anxiety. The same residents with rodent problems on their block are also plagued by other pressing urban issues such as vacant housing, drug sales on the street and the risk of being robbed and beaten up. The study found that the relationship between rats and depression is not explained by these other neighborhood conditions. The findings are published in the Journal of Community Psychology. This study provides very strong evidence that rats are an under appreciated stressor that affects how people feel about their lives in low-income neighborhoods. The good news is it's modifiable. If something is done to reduce the number of rats in these neighborhoods. VETERINARY MEDICINE: Rats linked to depression in man. Every time researchers would talk to residents of low-income neighborhoods about the troubling public health issues they face, German says, they expected to hear about drugs and HIV and access to healthy food. Time and again, she says, they heard about rats and trash. Many cities conduct a regular rat census or survey residents about urban conditions, but this is one of the first studies to examine the psychological toll of an entrenched rat population. VETERINARY MEDICINE: Rats linked to depression in man. The research by German and Carl A. Latkin, PhD, a professor at the Bloomberg School, analyzed data collected from 448 Baltimore residents recruited from impoverished neighborhoods between March 2010 and December 2011. Those who consider rats to be a big problem were 72 percent more likely to experience acute depressive symptoms than those who live in similar neighborhoods where rats are not a big problem, the researchers say. They found that people in rat-infested neighborhoods had the same strongly negative perceptions of rats as people in other neighborhoods, but had much more frequent encounters. Rats are typically found where they have access to food and shelter, finding trash to eat and vacant or poorly kept up housing in which to live in low-income urban areas.Read more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160316094308.htm. #trash # rats # depression

HANTA VIRUS KILLS AGAIN!!

The Hanta virus is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings or saliva. People can contract the disease when they breathe in the aerosolized virus resulting in Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome(HPS) The New Mexico Department of Health says a 54 year old man from Cibola County has died of hantavirus. An environmental investigation is been conducted at the patient's home to help reduce the risk to others. Since 1993, New Mexico has reported 103 lab-confirmed HPS cases with 43 deaths, the highest number of cases of any state.The New Mexico Department of Health reports that this is the second case of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in the state this year.

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Lassa fever death rates in Nigeria .

More than 130 people are suspected to have died from a Lassa fever outbreak in Nigeria, according to statistics from the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC). The disease can cause fever and haemorrhaging of various parts of the body -- including the eyes and nose -- and can be spread through contact with an infected rat. Person to person transmission is also possible, albeit less common. For people witnessing the symptoms, alarm bells may ring and raise fears of Ebola -- but this is not Ebola. West Africa as a region is seeing a flare-up of the disease, but Nigeria -- where Lassa fever was first discovered in 1969 -- is experiencing much higher mortality rates than usual. On average, Lassa fever is deadly in 1% of all individuals infected, with higher rates of 15% morbidity among people hospitalized for the illness, but the current outbreak in Nigeria has seen more than 50% of those affected dying from their infection. According to NCDC's latest report, dated 14 March 2016, the total number of reported cases is 254 (129 of which confirmed by lab tests) and the total number of deaths (suspected, probable and confirmed) is 137, with a Case Fatality Rate (CFR) of 53.9%. Increased mortality and spread. A 2012 outbreak of Lassa fever in Nigeria caused more than 1,700 people to become infected, but 112 deaths, according to the Nigerian Center for Disease Control (NCDC). Despite lower case numbers, the death toll in the current outbreak are already higher. "The deaths among cases are higher than normal, and we are currently establishing the reason for this," says Abdulsalami Nasidi, Director of the NCDC. A further concern is the geographic spread of the outbreak: "More states are affected (than usual), and we're evaluating possible reasons," says Nasidi. Beyond what's usual Lassa fever outbreaks occur most years in West Africa, as the disease is endemic to Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Each year, the virus infects an estimated 100,000 to 300,000 and is responsible for 5,000 deaths in the region as a whole. Ebola Fast Facts; Lassa virus is in the same family of viruses as Ebola and Marburg virus, which also cause fever and sometimes haemorrhage. The virus is named after the Nigerian town of Lassa where it was first discovered. Outbreaks generally occur during the region's dry season -- typically between November to February -- but this time it's persisting. Officials are speculating reasons for the increased mortality and spread, but the truth remains unknown. "Viruses change over time," says Nasidi. One theory officials are suggesting for the spread of the virus into new states, is that there may be better awareness of symptoms after the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, which has infected more than 28,000 people . Previously, infections often went unreported as the disease mainly affects rural areas where populations can be highly infected, but don't notify the authorities. How does Lassa fever spread? The main culprit behind the transmission of Lassa fever is the "multimammate rat" -- a reservoir for the virus with the ability to spread it to humans. Touching, consuming, or inhaling, the urine or feces of a rat carrying the virus is the prime route of infection in humans. This generally happens through contaminated food and surfaces within people's homes -- particularly during the dry season. When the rains are over, the rats then come closer to humans to steal grains," says David Heymann, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. In rural areas, communities often store grains in their homes after the harvest to get them through the dry season. "They urinate and defecate on the rice, which makes the uncooked rice a source of human infection," says Heymann. The meat of rodents is often eaten in the region, further increasing the likelihood of transmission. Contact with the bodily fluids, or tissues, of another human carrying the virus is also a mode of transmission, but more rare. symptoms and diagnosis The symptoms of the disease are wide-ranging and vary from mild to severe in different cases, making diagnosis a challenge. One in five of those infected will experience symptoms including haemorrhage, respiratory problems and facial swelling, especially if diagnosed late with the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The remaining 80% experience much milder symptoms such as fever and weakness, which can often go undiagnosed. Up to one third of people infected also risk losing their hearing. Treatment is available with the antiviral drug Ribavirin, but this has its greatest effect if used early. Taking control, through prevention; The NCDC and Ministry of Health have increased resources to handle the outbreak, such as mapping those at most risk, improving access to diagnostics and engaging with communities to recognize the signs and symptoms. "Every life counts and every case must be investigated," says Nasidi. Given the increased mortality, the priority is prevention. This includes reducing the chances of contact between humans and rat colonies. Sales of rat poison in Nigeria have boomed since the outbreak was announced, according to reports by the news service AFP. As with Ebola, awareness and increased use of personal protective equipment when handling patients is also crucial to prevent human to human transmission, particularly in health clinics. "The government has made the right recommendations about infection control in health facilities...the virus is passed from person to person by poor infection control," says Heymann. As outbreaks are somewhat regular, health officials are still hopeful the current spike in infections will come to a natural end. "From past experiences we expect numbers to start decreasing in March/April," says Nasidi. culled from :http://edition.cnn.com/2016/03/17/health/lassa-fever-outbreak-nigeria/index.html

Friday, January 29, 2016

RODENT CONTROL AND PREVENTION OF LASSA FEVER.

. Rats have been linked to the spread of a lot of disease ,some are fatal while others can be treated.The best way to stay safe is by rodent control.The health risk posed by rats affects man, poultry,dogs and some other animals. Diseases occur as a result of interaction between hosts, agent and environment.Rats are no different from all other carriers,in this sense hence environment influences the infection and risk/rate of exposure. Living in a dirty,unkempt environment increases the chances of infection and consequent spread of infection.Rats are know to thrive where there is food and water, and most rats can eat anything. Living in close quarters with dogs, poultry and horses increases risk of infection.Living in highly populated environment surrounded by filth also poses risk of infection.Rats find their way to food industry and food processing plants posing a risk of food contamination from source. Rats are everywhere causing diseases by contamination through urine,feces, hair,and feet. Rats basically transfer these disease agents by contamination of feed,food,water,toys and clothing.The best way to avoid any disease is by proper pest control and maintenance of clean environment.The following are steps to keeps rats out;1) Use of rat traps 2) keep houses/farms rodent proof; by removing unfinished food, cover bins and keep them far away from homes. 3) rat adhesive boards 4) baits 5)proper waste management. 6) rat-proof your doors,windows in farms,homes and factory. Rats cause food wastage resulting in economic losses,when a food is contaminated by urine or feces,throw away immediately. If you suspect your pets toy is contaminated with rat urine throw away,same with clothing or any other contaminated material. PIC CREDIT; INTERNET.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

RATS; THE MISSING LINK IN DISEASE TRANSMISSION.

The world has been faced with the issue of drug-resistance, super bugs and antibiotic residue in animal-by-products,forcing producers to look critically at methods of production and handling of products to resolve these issues. The war against super bugs is super hot with various school of thoughts proposing various theories and solutions to resolve the issue to ensure better health for man and the food animals consumed. The environment has been know to play host to various disease agents and the host/carriers are also housed in the environment,creating an unending cycle of infection to diverse hosts. Rats are ubiquitous,with the propensity to carry disease agents in their urine,feces,hair and feet.These creatures could actually be the missing link in the antibiotic resistance saga, their presence in poultry houses,farms and pet homes will result in feed/water contamination with urine/feces resulting in salmonellosis,which the farmer responds to using antibiotics. Since the source of infection is not removed, there will be a continuous cycle of infection-reinfection and treatment with various antibiotics .The threat of rats to health of man and animals is real and must be properly understood to ensure the necessary strategy is incorporated. A recent study by scientist in the University of Colombia, has revealed the risk that rats pose; Rats can absorb disease agents from their local environment and spread them, according to a University of British Colombia new study. The results also indicate that the threat rats pose to the health of poultry and humans has been underestimated.Researchers studied the feces of rats caught at an Abbotsford, B.C. poultry farm, and discovered they all carried avian pathogenic E. coli, a bacteria with the ability to cause disease in chickens and potentially humans. More than one quarter of the rats were carrying multidrug resistant strains of the bacteria. The findings support lead author Chelsea Himsworth's theory that rats act as a "pathogen sponge," soaking up bacteria from their environment. If rats can absorb pathogenic E. coli, then they could potentially be a source of all sorts of other pathogens that we have not anticipated," said Himsworth, assistant professor in the UBC School of Population and Public Health and leader of the Vancouver Rat Project, a group aiming to address the knowledge gap about the health threats associated with rats. Himsworth was surprised to find that the E. coli strains carried by the farm rats were very similar to those found in chickens, and totally different from E. coli strains found in urban rats. Basically, the rural rat gut looked like the poultry gut, and nothing like the urban rat gut . This latest study follows previous research by Himsworth that found human pathogens, including MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and C. difficile, in the feces of rats in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. Rat infestations ought to be taken seriously," said Himsworth. "They need to be tackled with an educated, informed approach in collaboration with scientists and pest control professionals. There shou the development of municipal programs for managing rat infestations and rat-related issues. Rodent control # rodenticide rodent bait # rodent proof. Twitter

RATS: THE UNCONVENTIONAL DISEASE CAUSING AGENT IN MAN AND ANIMALS.

more. see Twitter

Friday, January 22, 2016

HANDLING THE RAT MENACE..

. Rats have been linked to the spread of a lot of disease ,some are fatal while others can be treated.The best way to stay safe is by rodent control.The health risk posed by rats affects man, poultry,dogs and some other animals. Diseases occur as a result of interaction between hosts, agent and environment.Rats are no different from all other carriers,in this sense hence environment influences the infection and risk/rate of exposure. Living in a dirty,unkempt environment increases the chances of infection and consequent spread of infection.Rats are know to thrive where there is food and water, and most rats can eat anything. Living in close quarters with dogs, poultry and horses increases risk of infection.Living in highly populated environment surrounded by filth also poses risk of infection.Rats find their way to food industry and food processing plants posing a risk of food contamination from source. Rats are everywhere causing diseases by contamination through urine,feces, hair,and feet. Rats basically transfer these disease agents by contamination of feed,food,water,toys and clothing.The best way to avoid any disease is by proper pest control and maintenance of clean environment.The following are steps to keeps rats out;1) Use of rat traps 2) keep houses/farms rodent proof; by removing unfinished food, cover bins and keep them far away from homes. 3) rat adhesive boards 4) baits 5)proper waste management. 6) rat-proof your doors,windows in farms,homes and factory. Rats cause food wastage resulting in economic losses,when a food is contaminated by urine or feces,throw away immediately. If you suspect your pets toy is contaminated with rat urine throw away,same with clothing or any other contaminated material. Stay safe # avoid rat bites # dont eat rats # keep environment clean.

RAT FLEAS SPREAD HEART DAMAGING BACTERIA.

Bacteria that can cause serious heart disease in humans are being spread by rat fleas, sparking concern that the infections could become a bigger problem in humans. Research published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology suggests that brown rats may be carrying the bacteria. Since the early 1990s, more than 20 species of Bartonella bacteria have been discovered. They are considered to be emerging zoonotic pathogens, because they can cause serious illness in humans worldwide from heart disease to infection of the spleen and nervous system. "A new species called Bartonella rochalimae was recently discovered in a patient with an enlarged spleen who had travelled to South America," said Professor Chao-Chin Chang from the National Chung Hsing University in Taiwan. "This event raised concern that it could be a newly emerged zoonotic pathogen. Therefore, we decided to investigate further to understand if rodents living close to human environment could carry this bacteria." Scientists have found that rodents carry several pathogenic species of Bartonella, such as B. elizabethae, which can cause endocarditis and B. grahamii, which was found to cause neuroretinitis in humans. Although scientists are unsure about the main route of transmission, these infections are most likely to be spread by fleas. Ctenophthalmus nobilis, a flea that lives on bank voles, was shown to transmit different species of Bartonella bacteria. These pathogens have also been found in fleas that live on gerbils, cotton rats and brown rats. The scientists analysed bacteria found in Rattus norvegicus in Taiwan. The brown rat is also the most common rat in Europe, When the DNA of the bacteria was analyzed, it was discovered that a strain that is most closely related to B. rochalimae, which has been isolated recently from a human infection in the United States. The researchers took samples from 58 rodents, including 53 brown rats, 2 mice (Mus musculus) and 3 black rats (Rattus rattus). 6 of the rodents were found to be carrying Bartonella bacteria; 5 of these were brown rats. Four of the rodents were carrying B. elizabethae, which can cause heart disease in humans, and one of the black rats was found to be harbouring B. tribocorum. However, the scientists noticed one strain that had not been identified in rodents previously. The strain was finally shown to be close to B. rochalimae. These results raise concerns about the existence of other reservoirs and vectors for this emerging infection. Source; journal of medical microbiology. Twitter

Teenager infected with rat-bite fever from her pet rodent .

A 17-year-old woman was infected with the rare, but treatable rat-bite fever, that developed from pet rodents that lived in her bedroom, report the doctors who treated her.Rat-bite fever has been reported in writings dating as far back as 2300 years. It was originally described as a disease of the poor, but these days most cases occur in lab workers or in children with pet rodents.The condition is often goes unrecognized and undiagnosed. Most cases of rat-bite fever involve a bite or scratch from a rodent, but there are several reports of infection without direct bacterial inoculation. The young woman was admitted to hospital with pain in her right hip and lower back that had continued for two days and led to immobility. Over the proceeding two weeks, she had an intermittent fever, nausea and vomiting, and a pink rash on her hands and feet.Her nausea and vomiting improved, but the fever continued, and she had tenderness of a joint in her pelvis, and pain in her right leg. The doctors learnt that the woman had numerous pets including a dog, cat, horse and three pet rats. The rodents lived in her bedroom. One of these rats had died 3 weeks prior to onset of her symptoms.A blood test returned positive for --the most common cause of ratbite fever.The disease can have mortality as high as 13%, if left untreated. Fortunately, the woman underwent 4 weeks of antibiotics. After 5 days, her rash and fever disappeared, and the joint pain in her pelvis improved over the following weeks. She made a full recovery. Story source ; Science daily.

RATS POSE HEALTH THREAT TO MAN AND POULTRY.

Rats can absorb disease agents from their local environment and spread them, according to a University of British Colombia new study. The results also indicate that the threat rats pose to the health of poultry and humans has been underestimated.Researchers studied the feces of rats caught at an Abbotsford, B.C. poultry farm, and discovered they all carried avian pathogenic E. coli, a bacteria with the ability to cause disease in chickens and potentially humans. More than one quarter of the rats were carrying multidrug resistant strains of the bacteria. The findings support lead author Chelsea Himsworth's theory that rats act as a "pathogen sponge," soaking up bacteria from their environment. If rats can absorb pathogenic E. coli, then they could potentially be a source of all sorts of other pathogens that we have not anticipated," said Himsworth, assistant professor in the UBC School of Population and Public Health and leader of the Vancouver Rat Project, a group aiming to address the knowledge gap about the health threats associated with rats. Himsworth was surprised to find that the E. coli strains carried by the farm rats were very similar to those found in chickens, and totally different from E. coli strains found in urban rats. Basically, the rural rat gut looked like the poultry gut, and nothing like the urban rat gut . This latest study follows previous research by Himsworth that found human pathogens, including MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and C. difficile, in the feces of rats in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. Rat infestations ought to be taken seriously," said Himsworth. "They need to be tackled with an educated, informed approach in collaboration with scientists and pest control professionals. There should be the development of municipal programs for managing rat infestations and rat-related issues. Story source; University of British Colombia.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Antiviral favipiravir successfully treats Lassa virus in guinea pigs.

Favipiravir, an investigational antiviral drug currently being tested in West Africa as a treatment for Ebola virus disease, effectively treated Lassa virus infection in guinea pigs, according to a new study. Lassa fever is endemic to West Africa and affects about 300,000 people annually, killing roughly 5,000. In some parts of Sierra Leone and Liberia, it is believed nearly 15 percent of people admitted to hospitals have Lassa fever, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No vaccine or licensed treatment exists for Lassa fever, although ribavirin, licensed for hepatitis C treatment, has been used with limited success. In the new study, published Oct. 12, 2015, in Scientific Reports, favipiravir not only effectively treated guinea pigs infected with Lassa virus, it also worked better than ribavirin. Two days after infecting groups of guinea pigs with a lethal dose of Lassa virus, the scientists treated the rodents daily for two weeks with either ribavirin, low doses of favipiravir, or high doses of favipiravir. They also evaluated the effect of high-dose favipiravir in the rodents that began treatment five, seven or nine days after infection. All of the animals that received high-dose favipiravir were completely protected from lethal infection; animals treated seven or nine days after infection had begun showing signs of disease, but their conditions quickly improved when treatment began. Those animals in the low-dose favipiravir group showed mild to moderate signs of disease, but those symptoms resolved after about one week of treatment. The animals treated with ribavirin appeared normal during the treatment phase but developed severe disease shortly after treatment ended. Further testing and human clinical trials are needed to determine if favipiravir, also known as T-705 and Avigan, could effectively treat Lassa virus infection in people. Story source;NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Lassa fever .

Rats are carriers of both the spirochete bacteria responsible for Leptospirosis in man and animals and also the Lassa fever virus which affects man. The rat spread both infection by contamination with urine, when rats urine contaminate food and water, they spread these diseases. The consumption of rats have also been fingered in the spread of Lassa fever. The signs of Lassa infection occurs 1-3 weeks after exposure to the virus. The signs could be mild or severe and these are 1) slight fever 2) general malaise 3) weakness 4) headache. The severe signs include 1) bleeding/hemorrhaging in gums, eyes and nose. 2) respiratory distress 3)repeated vomiting 4) facial swelling 5) pain in chest ,back, abdomen and neck. Lassa fever infection also show neurological signs such as tremors, encephalitis and deafness. The treatment is supportive therapy of fluids and vitamins and Ribavirin, an antiviral drug. The prognosis is hinged on early treatment. Death usually occurs within 2 weeks after onset of symptoms. The major form of prevention is pest control; ensure your house, farms and factories are rodent proof. The proper disposal of waste is advised, remove all unfinished food and store food material on rodent-proof containers. Regular de-ratization in premises is advised. Do not eat rats. Stay safe # kill rats don’t eat them

RATS AND LEPTOSPIROSIS.

Leptospirosis a bacterial disease that affects humans and animals. It is caused by bacteria of the genus Leptospira. In humans, it can cause a wide range of symptoms, some of which may be similar to other diseases and some infected persons, however, may have mild to severe symptoms. Leptospirosis can lead to kidney damage, meningitis,liver failure, respiratory distress, and even death. The risk of infection with Leptospirosis is high with people close to animals such as dogs, cattle, horses, and pigs. These animals get infected when they are exposed to urine of infected rats, or have contact with contaminated drinking water or swimming/paddling through water inhabited by rats or contaminated by rat’s urine. When these animals are infected, they may show no signs of the disease. Infected animals may continue to excrete the bacteria into the environment continuously or every once in a while for a few months up to several years. Humans can become infected through; 1) Contact with urine (or other body fluids, except saliva) from infected animals. 2) Contact with water, soil, or food contaminated with the urine of infected animals. 3) The bacteria can enter the body through skin or mucous membranes of eyes, nose and mouth, especially if the skin is broken from a cut or scratch. 4) Drinking contaminated water can also cause infection. Outbreaks of Leptospirosis are caused by exposure to contaminated water, such as floodwaters and person to person transmission is rare. Leptospirosis occurs worldwide, but is most common in temperate or tropical climates. It is an occupational hazard for many people who work outdoors or with animals, such as: Farmers, Mine workers, Sewer workers, Slaughterhouse workers,(abattoir),Veterinarians and animal handlers, Fish farmers, and Dairy farmers. The time between a person's exposure to a contaminated source and becoming sick is 2 days to 4 weeks. Illness usually begins abruptly with fever and other symptoms. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS; In humans, Leptospirosis can cause mild or severe signs this include; 1) High fever 2) Headache 3) Chills 4) Muscle aches. The Severe signs include; 1) Vomiting 2) Jaundice (yellow skin and eyes) 3) Red eyes 4) Abdominal pain 5) Diarrhea and 6)Rash.

Monday, January 18, 2016

RATS AND LASSA FEVER!!!!

The role of pests in transmission of diseases cannot be overemphasized and thus steps must be taken to prevent entry of such pests in the food industry.The major pest to contend with in the food industry is rat.Rats cause severe economic losses along side transmission of diseases.Rats in the food industry can be excluded by blocking any cracks/openings in the building.Food can be stored in crates in stores away from rats. Rat baits can be used outside the food holding area while traps can be used in the food processing/packaging area. Hazard of rats in the food industry; 1) fecal contamination of food. 2) urine contamination of food products. 3) food waste due to consumption by rats. Rat urine has been linked to Lassa fever,thus contamination of food with urine is a risk to man.The infection in man manifests with fever,muscular pain,generalized weakness.Vomiting and diarrhea are also observed in affected patients.

Monday, October 5, 2015

PESTS AND FOOD SAFETY.

The role of pests in transmission of diseases cannot be overemphasized and thus steps must be taken to prevent entry of such pests in the food industry.The major pest to contend with in the food industry is rat.Rats cause sever economic losses along side transmission of diseases.Rats in the food industry can be excluded by blocking any cracks/openings in the building.Food can be stored in crates in stores away from rats. Rat baits can be used outside the food holding area while traps can be used in the food processing/packaging area. Hazard of rats in the food industry; 1) fecal contamination of food. 2) urine contamination of food products. 3) food waste due to consumption by rats. Rat urine has been linked to Lassa fever,thus contamination of food with urine is a risk to man.The infection in man manifests with fever,muscular pain,generalized weakness.Vomiting and diarrhea are also observed in affected patients.